A Perfect Day

Last Thursday I set off for my normal volunteering duties at Rowsley and was pleasantly surprised at how light the traffic was. A good and productive day was had in the carriage shed with the always welcome bit of socialising and putting the world to rights. Then off to Tideswell for some delicious fish and chips, taken to eat on the platform at Millers Dale station, where (old age does have some benefits) I recall steam days when there seemed to be a freight train through every few minutes, usually with a Fairburn tank doing the banking for the northbound ones taking their coal to the hungry Lancashire mills. Back to reality and the Peak District looked stunning with the sun casting long evening shadows as I drove home. On arrival I opened the post and found a letter from one of our supporters who lives ‘north of the border’ – and enclosed was a cheque for £500 towards our LMSCA efforts.

Makes it all seem worthwhile!

Dave Winter

PS the photo was taken at Millers Dale on 10 April 1964, shortly before Rowsley MPD closed.

Duke of Edinburgh’s Award volunteering on CCT 94630

We continue our series of 94630 updates with a guest post from Samuel, who is volunteering with the LMSCA to contribute to his achievements as part of the Duke of Edinburgh’s Award.

Hello. My name is Samuel, and I’m 15 years old. I am taking part in the Bronze Duke of Edinburgh’s award, the first level of the world’s leading youth achievement award, through the Peak District Shambles Explorer Scout group. As part of this award, you must spend three to six months volunteering. A lot of my friends decided to work at charity shops, or as young leaders for younger sections of our scout group. I decided I wanted to do something a little different, and the LMSCA seemed a great place to go. I am working on the eight doors of the covered carriage truck (CCT) †, as this will give me a chance to work on both my mechanical and woodwork skills, areas I would like to develop for the future. I hope to post regular updates on what I’ve been getting on with, as I get things done. So far, I have labelled all the doors, and have begun work on door B, removing all the wood panels from the inside of the door. By the end of my 6 months, I hope to have renovated all 8 doors to a usable condition for people getting in and out of the carriage.

94630 door

94630 door before stripping down

94630 door

94630 door before stripping down

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94630’s door after removal of planking and other fittings

† Editor’s note: Although the CCT may be more commonly known as a covered carriage truck, the LMS often referred to this type of vehicle as a covered combination truck.

Rowsley Update, Summer 2016

After the hubbub and excitement of the launch of 7828, thoughts may naturally veer towards launching into the next major project, but having the carriage shed at Rowsley vacant also offers the opportunity for some other valuable smaller projects. In the meantime 7828 has enjoyed use on dining and cream tea trains on Peak Rail, and appropriate to its era also being used during the 1940s weekend.

If it wans't for the the steel bridge this scene, of 7828 at Matlock during the 2016 1940s event, may very well be mistaken for one taken in the early 20th century

7828 at Matlock during the 2016 1940s event. If it wasn’t for the steel bridge in the background, this post-processed photo may very well be mistaken for one taken in the early 20th century. Photo © Alan Taylor

 

7828 departs Matlock Station

7828 departs Matlock Station

First into the shed after 7828’s outshopping was Peak Rail’s BR Mk2 BSO 9404 which was in for replacement of a window, minor bodywork repairs and a repaint to further protect refresh its external appearance.

BR Brake Second Open (BSO) 9404

BR Brake Second Open (BSO) 9404 in Matlock Station shortly after its repaint

Next into the shed is the one of the LMSCA’s own CCTs, 96430, which is to become a trim shop, enabling upholstery work to take place in a clean environment whilst other works can be concurrently carried out in the carriage shed.

Work on 94630 continues, with further updates to follow in the coming months

 

Official Launch of LMS 7828

On 29th March 2016, LMS Period 1 Third Open, 7828, was officially launched into service. Owned by the National Railway Museum and restored by the LMS Carriage Association, the carriage will now form part of Peak Rail’s service train.

This video covers the event, including the speeches that were given as well as views from the interior as afternoon tea is served.

 

 

 

 

LMS Carriage, 7828, Runs into Matlock

Following completion of the restoration work on LMS Period 1 Third Open, 7828, a period of running in was undertaken through the early part of March. This included the first run of an LMS carriage into Matlock station for the first time in probably over 50 years and has been captured in this short video.

The restoration of LMS 7828 in four minutes

On loan from the National Railway Museum since 2003, this LMS carriage, 7828, has been restored by a dedicated group of volunteers. The carriage was built in 1925 at Derby’s Carriage and Wagon Works on Litchurch Lane. With restoration completed in its 91st year the transformation has been remarkable.

7828 was withdrawn from passenger use in 1962, but gained a further lease of life as part of the London Midland Region mobile control train. Eventually it passed to the National Railway Museum in 1980. Restoration was then started by apprentices at Derby Carriage and Wagon works with the intention of assembling a joint LMS/LNER main line set.

Although restoration was started, the work was not completed and the coaches were stored, 7828 going to York. Other vehicles in the collection represented the LMS, so further work was of low priority. Some years later volunteers from the LMS Carriage Association became interested and 7828 was moved to Rowsley.

Many hours of research and hard work by the dedicated volunteers have culminated in the restoration of an historic carriage as part of the nation’s heritage railway collection. One in which passengers will be able to enjoy a journey back to yesteryear. This video shows the many years of work compressed down into just over 4 minutes.

(Note: The piece of music used in the video is called Coronation Scot, which was purchased by the film maker who has an amateur film maker’s music copyright license, covering mechanical copyright and the Phonographic Performance License. Amongst the criteria, it allows the use British music for public exhibition promoted for raising of funds for bona fide charitable causes of which the LMSCA is one.)

Restoration of LMS Period 1 Third Open, 7828, is complete!

On loan from the National Railway Museum since 2003, this LMS carriage, 7828, has been restored by a dedicated group of LMSCA volunteers. The carriage was built in 1925 at Derby’s Carriage and Wagon Works on Litchurch Lane. With restoration completed in its 91st year the transformation has been remarkable. Check out our teaser trailer for a sneaky peak at the restored carriage.

7828 Let Loose

The week commencing Monday 15th February saw a long held ambition of mine realised – to ride in an LMS coach on part of the old Midland main line.

After many years of restoration by LMSCA members, the National Railway Museum’s 1925 Derby built LMS Third Open 7828 was shunted out of our shed, turned on Peak Rail’s turntable, and added to the rake in the platform at Rowsley South. After a few checks a short steam hauled run to Church Lane crossing took place, followed after return to Rowsley South by running over two sets of crossovers including the tightest one on Peak Rail to check the action of the adaptor gangway with the Mk1 RBR that 7828 was coupled to. All seemed to be OK although the amount of sideways movement is a bit alarming to watch close up!

7828 remained on the running set during Peak Rail’s half-term midweek running with further checks carried out by carriage manager Harvey Coppock, then on Saturday 20th a group of working members boarded to carry out some snagging jobs – nothing major mainly missing or loose screws – and importantly to enjoy a longer ride, this time to Matlock Riverside. Everyone was of the same opinion – a smooth ride, perhaps slightly more bouncy than a Mk1, but LMS coaches are softly sprung; the steam heat worked and after some initial warm paint odours settled down; the brakes work – essential; the seating is very comfortable; and perhaps most important 7828 seems to make a big impression on all who see her, including the owner of a well known railway modelling company at Darley Dale who saw 7828 going past, had to come and have a look inside, and was most impressed.

Further work to ease some of the droplights is needed, and the dynamo needs attention but otherwise 7828 should be fit for its first revenue earning run as a dining coach on Mother’s Day 6th March.

Our next project at Rowsley is a 1935 Third Open No.9125, just ten years younger than 7828 but with large windows and art deco interior very different stylistically which fits well with the aims of the LMSCA to show the development of the LMS coach.

Dave Winter

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Society Spotlight: The Railway Correspondence and Travel Society (RCTS)

It was while browsing for photos of LMS carriages that I recently rediscovered to the RCTS website, and came upon some gems that are of particular interest to the LMS carriage restorer, within their carriage conundrums section.

Perhaps most relevant to the LMSCA is an article featuring our very own 27109, asking Where was LMSR TO 27109 hiding in the 1970’s & 1980’s? The article goes on further to query the possible uses of the other number known to be applied to this carriage, 65830. Answers on a postcard please.

LMS 27109 at Rowsley South

LMS 27109 at Rowsley South. © Derek Mason / LMSCA

Other LMS carriage conundrums include: Rannoch’s mystery carriage seeking the number of a carriage of LNWR origin, and Fisons Weedkilling Trains Carriages trying to establish the identity of several LMS carriages used in these trains in the 1970s.

Finally, we sadly visit the coaches that are with us no more, but nevertheless, it is important to record the history of their passing. LMSR/BR Non-Passenger Carrying Coaching Stock Disposals contains listings of disposals with some interesting snippets of information for LMS Traveling Post Office Vans, Gangwayed Passenger Brakes, General Utility Vans, Exhibition Vans, Gangwayed Insulated Cream Vans, and Steam Heating Generator Vans.

I extend a warm thank you to the RCTS, for sharing this valuable information with a wider audience.

7828 Round Up

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Seating bay

Seating bay

Assembled table tops awaiting stain and varnish

Assembled table tops awaiting stain and varnish

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A summary of work completed on 7828 in the last few months. It has become difficult to update at times when the coach is changing so quickly, but for several months most volunteers were engaged in preparing large quantities of components- either trimming seat parts, machining timber mouldings, varnishing, glazing, painting underframe or searching for brass work.

 

So, state of play as of today-

All seat back and end units are fitted, lined up and bolted down. We need some more screws to finish putting the full quota into each anchoring bracket, but as soon as they land we can install them, leaving the way clear to bolting in the seat bases.

Bases all trimmed, some are awaiting their piping. 8 armests are finished, the other 20 are having piping applied.

The luggage racks are up in the 3-bay saloon, and stacked up ready for the 4-bay. I would think they’ll be up by the end of, say, Tuesday. Table lamps are up in the 3-bay, ready for installation in the 4-bay, and the lights are up and working in the loos and vestibules. Ceiling lamps not delivered yet.

The droplights have been rebuilt, glazed with toughened glass, assembled and sealed, painted to gloss on the outside and varnished inside. Specially made felt sections (20mm x 10mm and 10mm x 10mm) have arrived to allow us to fit new seals to each side, which help with vibration and sound proofing as well as facilitating a smooth slide. These are ready to pin on, and then it’s just the leather straps to apply with the cleaned and painted fittings prior to installing in the coach. Each droplight, for saloon or door, has already been tested in it’s own numbered aperture.

Tables- all parts now made to reproduce the original early Period 1 LMS TO table. We borrowed a genuine example from the team at Swanwick, and have produced a set of 14 in solid utile. The previously mentioned leg base castings are machined ready to go, and the fixing brackets and tabs are sorted into boxes. 7 table tops have been assembled to date, it’s a fill in job when we get an hour at the end of another task.

Toilets- sink and loo fitted in No.1 loo, all works. Loo seats and lids to varnish. Parts ready for No.2. New toilet roll holder cast and fitted. Paper towel holders sourced and mounted, bins procured. Vacant/engaged locks have arrived thanks for team based on ELR, modified to suit 7828 and now ready to fit. New left handed keeper plates have been cast and drilled. Some jiggery-pokery to convert the door locking system back to as-built is underway. The main door handles are now fitted and working.

Vestibules- not much gone on here, apart from draught excluders fitted around the side door apertures, as these areas have been virtually finished for some time. The clips to hold open the partition sliding doors were discovered and fitted.

Underframe- fusebox in process of being put back where it was meant to be, and some painting undertaken at the ends. Still gloss black to go on some bogies parts and the trusses, when we shunt it out again.

Lining- continues… Livery- LMS transfers due in 2 weeks time.

A list of final jobs exists in the carriage shed, ranging from window cleaning to spotting odd missing panel screws, gluing in bell pushes to hanging lampshades. Come see.